Widescreen Thoughts on “The Sound of Music”

As part of 2018’s Turner Classic Movies (TCM) Big Screen Classics series, TCM and 20th Century Fox presented their classic film The Sound of Music (1965) on the big screen in September. And, let me tell you, seeing this film in all of its big screen glory was music to both my ears and eyes.

Seriously, I’ve seen this film on a TV screen so many times, both in old school (and frustrating) pan-and-scan as well as in widescreen formats. However, seeing the film in widescreen and with its beautiful digital restoration was almost like seeing the film for the first time (I’m sure that this will be an oft-used statement on this blog–I really prefer watching any film on the big screen, particularly classic ones).

Familiar scenes seemed new again. And the romance between Maria (Julie Andrews) and Captain Von Trapp (Christopher Plummer) seemed all the more real and believable by being able to watch their stellar performances in a magnified way.

All images ©️ 20th Century Fox

While I adored hearing all of the Rodgers and Hammerstein songs again in on the theater’s speakers, I mostly just came away so impressed with the craftsmanship that director Robert Wise and his team put into the film. One of my friends commented after the screening that “there’s not a bad shot in it.” And I would concur. Every shot is artful, beautiful, and meaningful. (And I want to know how in the world the team lit the famous “Something Good” gazebo scene. It’s just so good.)

I loved seeing this film again on the big screen and wish you all could have been there, too.

Image ©️ 20th Century Fox and TCM

“Jurassic Park” Turns 25

Can you even believe it’s been 25 years since the original Jurassic Park (Universal, 1993) hit the big screen for the first time?

The Steven Spielberg-directed film, based on the 1990 novel by Michael Crichton (Crichton also co-wrote the screenplay with David Koepp), was a huge hit in 1993 and for good reason. With a compelling story, its marvelous use of both practical and digital special effects, a great cast, a brilliant soundtrack by John Williams, and an amazing crew, Jurassic Park was a movie thrill ride of the first order. 

The film has spurred multiple sequels, but none of them can match the creativity, craftsmanship, terror, and excitement of this first outing. 

Universal Pictures recently screened Jurassic Park again in theaters across the U.S.A. to celebrate its 25th anniversary. It was such a blast to revisit this film on the big screen. I enjoyed it just as much as I did back in the day. Wish you all were there, too.

The studio also held a contest for fans to send recreations of the film. Here’s a compilation of the best fan films, courtesy of Universal Pictures.

Do yourself a favor and skip the lousy sequels and watch the original and still best–1993’s Jurassic Park.

All images ©️ Universal Pictures

Dates Announced for the 2019 TCM Classic Film Festival

We at the Movies Past and Present blog are huge fans of the Turner Classic Movies (TCM) network. Not only does TCM curate wonderful classic film programming 24/7 on their cable network, TCM also puts on one of the best classic movie festivals in the country with their annual TCM Classic Film Festival. Both the network and festival are celebrating major milestones in 2019—TCM turns 25 and the TCM Classic Film Festival turns 10. 

Logo ©️ TCM

The 2019 TCM Classic Film Festival will be held on April 11-14, 2019 in Hollywood, California. The theme for this year’s film festival is “Follow Your Heart: Love at the Movies.” Tickets will go on sale in November 2018 (specific date TBA). Here’s an official statement from the TCM Classic Film Festival website:

“Whether it’s in the afternoon, at first sight or in the air, the TCM Classic Film Festival will celebrate love in all of its forms. As we come together for the 10th Annual Festival, and the 25th anniversary of TCM, there will be many-splendored moments to revel in romance and obsessions, delight in faithful friendships and surrender to the enduring allure of the silver screen with fellow classic movie lovers.”

We can’t wait! For all of the latest information on the upcoming TCM Classic Film Festival, visit http://filmfestival.tcm.com. See you in Hollywood in April 2019!

Megaplex Theatres’ 2018 Silver Screen Classics Series

The Megaplex Theatres movie theater chain in Utah (where I live) is running their excellent “Silver Screen Classics” film series again this fall. Starting today (September 3), select Megaplex Theatres will be screening a classic film every Monday and Wednesday for the next 10 weeks. Screenings are at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

The cost is an unbelievable $10 (yes, that’s $10) for all 10 classic films. Passes are available at participating Megaplex Theatres (I bought my pass at the Megaplex 17 at Jordan Commons box office). Check the Megaplex Theatres website (www.megaplextheatres.com) to see if your local Megaplex Theatres location is participating. (I had to go to the specific theater on the website and look through the movie times on each specific date. The experience was, to say the least, a bit clunky. Hopefully, Megaplex Theatres will put some additional content about the Silver Screen Classics on their website soon.)

Here’s the list of films along with a link to each film’s page on Rotten Tomatoes. Hope to see you at one of these screenings!


The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)
September 3 and 5

©️ Warner Bros.


Funny Face
 (1957)
September 10 and 12

©️ Paramount Pictures


She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
September 17 and 19

©️ RKO Pictures


Field of Dreams (1989)
September 24 and 26

©️ Universal Pictures


An American in Paris (1951)
October 1 and 3

©️ MGM


The African Queen (1951)
October 8 and 10

©️ United Artists


Silverado
(1985)
October 15 and 17

©️ Columbia Pictures


The Godfather (1972)
October 22 and 24

©️ Paramount Pictures


Spartacus (1960)
October 29 and 31

©️ Universal Pictures


Jaws (1975)
November 5 and 7

©️ Universal Pictures

“West Side Story” on the Big Screen

TCM showed West Side Story (1961) on the big screen a few days ago as part of their ongoing Big Screen Classics series and I can’t stop thinking about it. From the brilliant direction by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, to the masterful music and lyrics by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim, to the electric performances by the entire cast, it’s no wonder this film is so beloved.

Here’s one of my favorite musical numbers from the movie, the “Tonight” quintet and chorus.

I’m also very excited about the news that director Steven Spielberg is set to remake the musical. We need its message now more than ever.

Many thanks to TCM and Fathom Events for bringing these classic films to the big screen for us film lovers to learn from and enjoy.

Image ©️ Turner Classic Movies

Why I Love “Sunset Boulevard”

What hasn’t already been said Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950)? This exploration into the dark side of desperation, fame, and fortune in Hollywood is a masterwork in all regards. It’s currently at number 16 on the American Film Institute’s “100 Years…100 Movies” ranking, among its placement on other prestigious lists. And after having recently seen it again on the big screen thanks to both the TCM Classic Film Festival and the TCM Big Screen Classics series, I was reminded (as if I had forgotten…not) how much I love this film.

Here’s a little photo essay about why I love Sunset Boulevard.

I love the opening scene which perfectly sets the tone for the film.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love the witty and snarky narration of the Joe Gillis character, perfectly interpreted by William Holden.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I am simultaneously creeped out and delighted by Gloria Swanson’s brilliant performance as faded silent film star Norma Desmond.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I am haunted and fascinated by Norma Desmond’s decrepit mansion, inside and out.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

And I’m just utterly disgusted by the disingenuous and terrible relationship of Joe and Norma (and isn’t that the point?).

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love the perfect composition of every shot in the film.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love how quotable the movie is. Some of my famous favorites:

“I am big. It’s the pictures that got small.”

“We didn’t need dialogue. We had faces.”

“Funny, how gentle people get with you once you’re dead.”

I am heartbroken by Erich von Stroheim’s performance as Max, Norman Desmond’s butler (and ex-husband and the last, sole member of her fan club).

Image ©️Paramount Pictures

I love the intersection of fact and fiction with the real people playing themselves (Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, Hedda Hopper, etc.) interspersed with the fictional characters.

Cecil B. DeMille and Gloria Swanson on the set of SUNSET BOULEVARD. Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Nancy Olson’s performance as Betty is the perfect balance of youthful optimism and unbridled ambition.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Norma’s full descent into madness after killing Joe is both devastating and breathtaking. Hedda Hopper’s face says it all.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

And one final quote: “And I promise you I’ll never desert you again because after Salome we’ll make another picture and another picture. You see, this is my life! It always will be! Nothing else! Just us, the cameras, and those wonderful people out there in the dark! All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

2018 TCM Classic Film Festival Recap

I had such a marvelous time at the 2018 Turner Classic Movies (TCM) Classic Film Festival. I tried to mix things up and see a combination of new discoveries and old favorites. It was all so fantastic, I didn’t want it to end (which is always a good thing, right?). Here’s a brief recap.

Day One – Thursday, April 26

Panel: “Meet TCM”
I began this year’s festival by attending a very interesting panel featuring some of the high-level management of the TCM network. The network is in good hands and they are definitely focused on their mission of keeping classic movies alive.

Finishing School (1934)
This terrific pre-Code film was a great way to kick off the opening night of the festival. Ginger Rogers and Frances Dee starred as two girls at a finishing school who are navigating their way into adulthood. Frances Dee’s grandson Wyatt McCrea was there to introduce the film (he’s also the grandson of Joel McCrea, Frances’ husband).

Image ©️ Warner Bros. Classics

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
While not part of the TCM Classic Film Festival, I couldn’t resist seeing this mega super hero extravaganza on the film’s opening night at the lovely El Capitan Theatre, which is just across the street from the TCL Chinese Theater. It was such a blast seeing this action film with such an enthusiastic, exuberant, and expressive crowd.

A “prop” (not sure if it was used in the film since the character was entirely CGI) of Thanos’ infamous Infinity Gauntlet was on display in the theatre lobby

Day Two – Friday, April 27

Presentation: “Pink Panther Cartoons on the Big Screen: The Coolest Cat in Town”
Hosted by animation expert and producer Jerry Beck, this presentation highlighted the Pink Panther cartoon shorts from the 1960s produced by Mirisch Films. Jerry talked about their origin (they were based on the opening credit sequence of the first Pink Panther live-action feature film released in 1963), brought in some folks involved with the making of the cartoons, talked a bit about their history, and then screened a few, including the very first one, “The Pink Phink.” Really fun.

Image ©️ Larry Mirisch, MGM, and Park Circus LLC

Presentation: “Mickey in Hollywood”
Mickey Mouse is celebrating his 90th birthday this year. This presentation, hosted by historian J.B. Kaufman, focused on the history of  Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse in the early days of Hollywood. Kaufman also talked about his new book that he is finishing up for Taschen about the history of Mickey Mouse which should be a tremendous volume for Disney fans. He then screened a few enjoyable short films that included Hollywood specific-references, including “Mickey’s Polo Team” and “Mickey’s Gala Premiere.”

Image ©️ Disney Enterprises, Inc.

Three Smart Girls (1936)
Enjoyed this cute comedy about three daughters scheming to bring their divorced parents together. It was the feature film debut of Deanna Durbin and the big box office generated by the film saved the then-cashed-strapped Universal Studios. The film was presented in 35mm with a print preserved by the U.S. Library of Congress.

Image ©️ Universal Pictures

Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
Before there was this year’s big Academy Award®️ winner The Shape of Water, there was the so-bad-it’s-good B-movie Creature from the Black Lagoon. (Comedian Dennis Miller introduced the film as “The Shape of Water without the zipper.”) A relatively recent 3D rendered print was screened at the festival and it was a hoot.

Image ©️ Universal Pictures

Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957)
This comedic satire starring Tony Randall, Jayne Mansfield, and Joan Blondell about an advertising executive who gets in a bit over his head majorly loses steam in the third act, but was still a lot of fun to see on a big screen with an appreciative crowd.

Image ©️ Twentieth Century Fox

Day Three – Saturday, April 28
I indulged and spent the entire day at the TCL Chinese Theatre and watched four of my classic movie favorites in one of my all-time favorite theaters.

His Girl Friday (1940)
This marvelously witty screwball comedy is always a pure delight to watch. It was my first time seeing this film on the big screen and I totally loved it.

Image ©️ Sony Pictures

Bullitt (1968)
Again, my first time seeing this seminal classic on the big screen, Bullitt did not disappoint. In fact, it was probably my favorite experience at this year’s festival. The crowd applauded both before and after the film’s legendary car chase scene through the streets of San Francisco.

Image ©️ Warner Bros. Classics

Sunset Boulevard (1950)
Seeing this film about Hollywood in one of the most iconic theaters in Hollywood was just the best. Actress Nancy Olson, who plays Betty in the film, was there to introduce it, too.

Image ©️Paramount Pictures

Heaven Can Wait (1978)
A favorite of my childhood, it was wonderful to see this newly restored film again on the big screen. And it was just as good as I remembered it. Actress Dyan Cannon and writer/co-director Buck Henry were there to introduce the film.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Day Four – Sunday, April 29

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)
Seeing this brilliant spaghetti western from Sergio Leone on the big screen was a revelation. Such a beautiful, masterful movie filmed both in Italy and in my home state of Utah (and Arizona, too). Writer/director John Sayles was on hand to introduce the film and it was like a 10-minute film school lecture that I never wanted to end. So great.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Intruder in the Dust (1949)
Loved this film adaptation of William Faulkner’s poignant book. In fact, Faulkner himself even consulted with the filmmakers (mind blown…).

Image ©️ Warner Bros. Classics

Silk Stockings (1957)
This was my first time seeing this musical adaptation of Ninochkta. Starring Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse, and with songs by Cole Porter, it was bliss to experience this breezy film on the big screen.

Image ©️ Warner Bros. Classics

The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944)
Final film of the festival was a comedic farce by auteur Preston Sturges about a woman who perhaps gives up too much for her country. Really good stuff and not the type of film I would probably ever see if left to my own devices.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I am a member of the TCM Backlot and TCM provided a lot of cool, exclusive experiences for Backlot members at the Festival, including some fun meet and greets, a hard hat tour of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ new Academy Museum that is currently under construction, and a private tour of the American Society of Cinematographers‘ headquarters. While I couldn’t attend all of these events, the ones I went to were stellar. If you’re not a member of TCM Backlot, you really should be. More info is at www.tcmbacklot.com.

All in all, I experienced four days of movie fan heaven at the TCM Classic Film Festival. Next year, the festival will celebrate its 10th year (and the 25th year of the TCM cable network). I hope to be able to be there. Thanks again to the entire TCM team who put on this outstanding event.

 

 

Initial Picks for the 2018 TCM Classic Film Festival

I’m really looking forward to attending the 2018 Turner Classic Movies (TCM) Classic Film Festival later this month in Los Angeles. TCM always does an incredible job with curating an eclectic and relevant group of films to enjoy along with bringing in outstanding guests to introduce each screening.

Now that the festival schedule has been published, I’ve been going through the agonizing task of trying to choose which films to see (because mostly I just wish I could see them all). Here are my initial picks (subject to change, of course).

Day One – Thursday, April 26

Finishing School (1934) — Starring Ginger Rogers and Frances Dee and directed by Wanda Tuchock, this pre-Production Code (or “pre-code”) film about young women taking their first steps into adulthood was one of the first films to be condemned by the Catholic Legion of Decency (we’ll see how saucy it really is if I can get into the screening). It’s being screened in 35mm with a print from the U.S. Library of Congress and is being introduced by film historian Jeremy Arnold and Wyatt McCrea, the eldest grandson of the film’s star Frances Dee.

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) — While not part of the TCM Classic Film Festival, I was able to get a ticket to a late-night screening of this highly-anticipated (for me, at least) film on its opening night at the marvelous El Capitan Theatre. Should be fun.

Day Two – Friday, April 27

The plan is to spend Friday morning attending two potentially cool animation presentations. First up is a screening of a curated group of “Pink Panther” theatrical cartoons created by Friz Freleng and David DePatie for The Mirisch Company in the 1960s. Hosting the presentation are animation expert Jerry Beck and film executive Lawrence A. Mirisch. Next is a presentation about Walt Disney and the creation and evolution of Mickey Mouse (who is celebrating his 90th birthday) by noted animation historian J.B. Kaufman. Attending this presentation is a no-brainer if you’re a big Disney fan like I am.

The rest of the films I hope to see on Friday include:

Blessed Event (1932) — Another pre-code film, this time a comedy starring Lee Tracy as a newspaper advertising man who takes over the writing of the newspaper’s gossip column and turns it into an outrageous success. Also stars Dick Powell in his film debut along with Ruth Donnelly, Gladys Price, and Ned Sparks. This is also a 35mm print from the U.S. Library of Congress. The screening will be introduced by the Film Forum‘s long-time director of programming Bruce Goldstein.

The Right Stuff (1983) — Based on the book by Tom Wolfe and directed by Philip Kaufman, the film tells the story of the early days of NASA and the U.S. space program. I never had the chance to see this epic film on the big screen, so now is my opportunity. It will be introduced by two actresses from the film: Veronica Cartwright who played Betty Grissom, the wife of astronaut Gus Grissom who was tragically killed in the Apollo 1 disaster in 1967, and Mary Jo Deschanel who played Annie Glenn, the wife of astronaut John Glenn.

Leave Her to Heaven (1945) — This Technicolor melodrama starring Gene Tierney as a crazy lady is going be screened with a special nitrate print and will be hosted by Todd Wiener from the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

Day Three – Saturday, April 28

I am indulging on Saturday and am planning to spend the entire day at the glorious TCL Chinese Theatre watching films all of which I’ve already seen but three of which I’ve never seen on the big screen before.

His Girl Friday (1940) — One of the all-time great comedies starring Rosalind Russell and Cary Grant will include an introduction by author, journalist, and documentary filmmaker Cari Beauchamp.

Bullitt (1968) — This gritty crime drama is particularly beloved by me because the incredibly cool 1968 Ford Mustang GT fastback that Steve McQueen drives in the film. (The original “Bullitt” Mustang has been missing for many years and recently resurfaced. More info is here.) I’m so excited to see the legendary car chase scene in the film on the big screen, too. Introducing the film is actress Jacqueline Bisset who plays Steve McQueen’s love interest.

Sunset Boulevard (1950) — Although this favorite film noir is going to be screened next month at my local theater as part of the TCM Big Screen Classics series, I just can’t pass up the chance to see this film in the TCL Chinese Theatre. It will be introduced by actress Nancy Olson Livingston, who played the young writer Betty Schaefer in the film (another reason to see this screening).

Heaven Can Wait (1978) — This Warren Beatty-directed remake of the classic comedy Here Comes Mr. Jordan is a favorite film of my youth. Introducing the film are actor and writer Buck Henry and actress Dyan Cannon (really!).

The Big Lebowski (1998) — This one is my least favorite of the five films planned for Saturday and even though it’s also part of this year’s TCM Big Screen Classics series, I’m probably going to give this revered and wacky Coen Brothers’ film another chance. (Still subject to change. But have I mentioned lately that I just want to spend a day in the TCL Chinese Theater?)

Day Four – Sunday, April 29

The jury is still out on films for Sunday–partly because there are five slots still “to be announced” by TCM (typically, these are popular films screened earlier in the festival and TCM provides another chance to see them). In the morning, I need to decide between Francis Ford Coppola’s gorgeous The Black Stallion (1979) or the classic Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn comedy Woman of the Year (1942). I’m also considering the Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse musical Silk Stockings (1957) in the afternoon. If the TBA films aren’t to my liking, then I might spend the entire afternoon at the TCL Chinese Theatre watching Cecil B. DeMille’s four-hour epic The Ten Commandments (1956) on the big screen for the first time (I’ve only ever seen it on TV). Last choice is between a screening of the silent version of The Phantom of the Opera (1925) with a live orchestra, Animal House (1978), which isn’t my favorite film but director John Landis and many of the film’s stars will be in attendance, or another TBA screening.

All in all, it should be a memorable weekend. Many thanks to TCM for putting together such a great event (and for making it impossible to choose!). Hope to see you there!

(Image ©️ Turner Classic Movies)

Happy 40th Birthday to “Grease”

Not wanting to make anyone feel old (myself included), but can you believe that Grease has been the word for 40 years?

After making its debut in movie theaters in the summer of 1978, Grease, directed by Randal Kleiser and based on the hit Broadway musical by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey, is still one of the world’s all-time favorite Hollywood musicals. To celebrate the film’s 40th anniversary, Paramount Pictures, Turner Classic Movies (TCM), and Fathom Events are screening this raunchy and revered film across the U.S.A. this week as part of the TCM Big Screen Classics series (ticket info is here.). Paramount is also releasing a new 40th anniversary edition of the film on Blu-ray, Digital, and 4K Ultra HD on April 24.

Hot off of the 1977 mega hit film Saturday Night Fever, John Travolta was able to show off more dance moves and his great comedic timing as leading man and supposed tough guy Danny. And making her film debut was country singer Olivia Newton-John as the innocent and lovestruck Australian transfer student Sandy. The chemistry between the two stars is clearly one of the contributors of the film’s lasting appeal, not to mention the outstanding supporting cast of Stockard Channing, Jeff Conaway, Eve Arden, Dody Goodman, Joan Blondell, Sid Caesar, Frankie Avalon, and others.

Sandy (Olivia Newton-John) and Danny (John Travolta) try to keep their summer fling alive while navigating the vicissitudes of their high school cliques in GREASE. (Image ©️ Paramount Pictures)

But I think it’s the music that keeps Grease alive. The film’s soundtrack was a monster hit. From the unforgettable opening fanfare of the title track (written with a disco vibe by the Bee Gees’ Barry Gibb and sung with perfection by Frankie Valli; check out this awesome YouTube clip below of Valli performing the song in 1978 on the TV dance show Soul Train), to Olivia Newton-John/Sandy crooning about her hopeless devotion to John Travolta/Danny, to the whole gang singing their hearts out about their forever friendship even after high school graduation, the soundtrack is non-stop nostalgia and fun.

Here’s the film’s original trailer from 1978.

As an added bonus, here’s the film’s original one-sheet poster, also from 1978.

Original 1978 theatrical poster. (Image ©️ Paramount Pictures)

Enjoy Grease again on the big screen and at home this month. And remember, as Eve Arden/Principal McGee says, “if you can’t be an athlete, be an athletic supporter.”

“Vertigo” Turns 60

Alfred Hitchcock’s psychological thriller Vertigo turns 60 this year. Turner Classic Movies (TCM), along with Fathom Events, is screening Vertigo to honor the film’s 60th anniversary on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 as part of their excellent TCM Big Screen Classics film series.

Here’s the original trailer for the film:

When it was released in 1958, Vertigo was not a success. In fact, critics dismissed it and the film bombed at the box office. According to OpenCulture.com, Hitchcock himself kept the film out of circulation entirely between 1973 and his death in 1980.

It wasn’t until the passing of Alfred Hitchcock that critics and cinephiles began to more seriously take notice (although the film had the strong allegiance of early fans as evidenced in the interview below with director Martin Scorsese).

Now, Vertigo is considered by many to be one of the best films ever made. In 2007, it moved to the #9 spot in the American Film Institute’s (AFI) 10th anniversary edition of its prestigious “100 Years…100 Movies” list. And after a steady, multi-year climb, Vertigo was recognized as the #1 film in 2012 by the British Film Institute (BFI) in their “Greatest Films of All Time” poll, knocking Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane out of its long-held top spot.

British film critic Tim Robey had this to say about both the film’s ascent to the top of the BFI poll and his own opinions about the staying (and growing) power of this Hitchcock classic:

“Even though its rehabilitation as a classic was well under way at the time, I remember my first viewing being something of a disappointment, too. I was hoovering up Hitchcocks from their TV airings in my mid-teens, high on Psycho and Notorious, and found the whole structure of this one broken and bewildering. It didn’t satisfy my early notions of what ‘Hitchcockian’ meant, and the lure of it as romantic fantasy probably didn’t strike much of a chord either. Next to the addictive wickedness of his other thrillers, it was an oddly foreign proposition, arty and stilted-seeming.

“What I hadn’t realised is that Vertigo is the ultimate grower. If its laboriously slow ascent to the highest stratum of critical adoration has proved anything, it is that. In its very bones, the movie is about a repetitive pattern of romantic obsession, and it is entirely fitting that such a pattern makes more sense the more we see it repeated: it’s an experience that gets correspondingly more deep and dreamlike with every viewing, echoing further back into the reaches of the subconscious. There’s something quasi-religious about returning to it, knowing all the mistakes that Stewart’s Scottie Ferguson is going to make all over again, and recognising every facet of Kim Novak, from ethereally seductive to seemingly guileless to manipulative and doomed.”

Vertigo is also available on Blu-ray and your favorite digital download platforms, but don’t miss this opportunity to see the special 60th anniversary screening of this cinema classic on the big screen. Check the Fathom Events website for times and locations and for information about upcoming TCM Big Screen Classics.