Why I Love “Sunset Boulevard”

What hasn’t already been said Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950)? This exploration into the dark side of desperation, fame, and fortune in Hollywood is a masterwork in all regards. It’s currently at number 16 on the American Film Institute’s “100 Years…100 Movies” ranking, among its placement on other prestigious lists. And after having recently seen it again on the big screen thanks to both the TCM Classic Film Festival and the TCM Big Screen Classics series, I was reminded (as if I had forgotten…not) how much I love this film.

Here’s a little photo essay about why I love Sunset Boulevard.

I love the opening scene which perfectly sets the tone for the film.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love the witty and snarky narration of the Joe Gillis character, perfectly interpreted by William Holden.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I am simultaneously creeped out and delighted by Gloria Swanson’s brilliant performance as faded silent film star Norma Desmond.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I am haunted and fascinated by Norma Desmond’s decrepit mansion, inside and out.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

And I’m just utterly disgusted by the disingenuous and terrible relationship of Joe and Norma (and isn’t that the point?).

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love the perfect composition of every shot in the film.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

I love how quotable the movie is. Some of my famous favorites:

“I am big. It’s the pictures that got small.”

“We didn’t need dialogue. We had faces.”

“Funny, how gentle people get with you once you’re dead.”

I am heartbroken by Erich von Stroheim’s performance as Max, Norman Desmond’s butler (and ex-husband and the last, sole member of her fan club).

Image ©️Paramount Pictures

I love the intersection of fact and fiction with the real people playing themselves (Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, Hedda Hopper, etc.) interspersed with the fictional characters.

Cecil B. DeMille and Gloria Swanson on the set of SUNSET BOULEVARD. Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Nancy Olson’s performance as Betty is the perfect balance of youthful optimism and unbridled ambition.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

Norma’s full descent into madness after killing Joe is both devastating and breathtaking. Hedda Hopper’s face says it all.

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

And one final quote: “And I promise you I’ll never desert you again because after Salome we’ll make another picture and another picture. You see, this is my life! It always will be! Nothing else! Just us, the cameras, and those wonderful people out there in the dark! All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”

Image ©️ Paramount Pictures

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